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Published Articles by Doris Weatherford

Learning Or Shopping?

The New York Times comes in my mailbox every day on the same day that people in New York buy it from their newsstands.  It has become a model of efficiency that other papers, especially the Tampa Bay Times, should emulate.  The New Yorkers send it electronically to Lakeland, where it is printed, and it gets to my mailbox that same day.  I read it thoroughly -- even though the lack of comics and good news often makes me depressed.  Read More 

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Goodbye To Two Good Ones

Publisher Patrick announced the passing of our mutual friend Jeff Carnes in the last edition of LaGaceta, and I want to add to that.  Jeff – and his longtime companion, Edith Stewart, the retired lobbyist for Hillsborough County – have been wonderful longtime friends.  Hubby first met him when both participated in the labor movement, Jeff as a unionized firefighter and Hubby as an activist with United Faculty of Florida.  (Yes, Hubby did have a Harvard doctorate in philosophy, but his favorite pastime was playing poker with blue-collar guys.)  Read More 

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I'm Back

 

At least briefly, as long as I can force my brain to coordinate with my fingers.  I want to thank the many of who called, e-mailed, and sent cards and flowers during this difficult time.  Everything is greatly appreciated, and I hope that sometime soon, I shall be able to send personal thanks.  I especially want to take this opportunity to express my appreciation to La Gaceta for keeping me on the payroll during the six weeks that I didn't write.

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Unnoted Progress

The November election and its aftermath consumed whole pulpwood forests and many tankers of ink and trillions of electronic pixels, but there's still one thing that needs to be noted.  Wondrously enough, it is good news – and I guess it also is good news that we have the luxury of overlooking our cultural progress.  Read More 

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These Were No Trumped-Up Charges

It's over, and I am glad.  Being a historian is comforting:  most historians can predict what most of us will write in the future, and now we can ease up on fretting about the present.  Let me say here and now, though, that I am very confident that Donald Trump -- the only president to have been impeached twice by hundreds of members of the US House -- will rank at the bottom of every list of esteemed presidents.  Read More 

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Super Bowl and Super Memories

I agonized for days about watching the Super Bowl, feeling ambivalent because of my lost Hubby.  He would have been so excited! When I did decide to watch, it was hard to look at his empty chair.  He lived long enough to know about Tom Brady and greatly admired this ancient athlete.  Beyond that, the game was in Tampa!  And the February weather was exactly what the Chamber of Commerce ordered.  He would have been happy, but it made me sad that he wasn't here to enjoy it. Moreover, it was on Sunday the 7th and wouldn't have interfered with our 55th anniversary on the 8th.  Yes, the Super Bowl began the year we married, 1966. Read More 

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"The world is too much with me"

To modify William Wordsworth's poem a bit, for just my singular usage.  Almost every day, I feel that the modern world is too much. No, I don't want to go back to the 1950s, when a long-distance call was a big deal – but it seems to me that creation of academic departments of communication in fact has lessened communication.  Or something.  Most of the young people I encounter on the phone are polite and sound sincere, but they seem to be largely incompetent.  That is if you can get a human, after passing through countless menus, messages about COVID, privacy, and a bunch other things that are not the reason for your call. Read More 

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Exhausted

I haven't looked seriously at high-school curricula in a long time, but back when I was a student – and, indeed, when I was a teacher in a high-quality Massachusetts school – few history classes made it to World War II.  Even today I remain appalled that when, near the end of the 1972 school year, I mentioned to a fellow teacher that I was into the postwar era, she timidly inquired, "About World War II; we did win, didn't we?"  Read More 

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Sound of Silence

Last week, I wrote about some thoughts I had while watching the January 6 invasion of the US Capitol.  This week, I'm going to begin with the C-Span coverage of the debate on the only president to be impeached twice – by a majority vote of our representatives.  Every House member who wished to speak was given a designated amount of time by the floor leader of their party, usually thirty seconds.  The Republican in this position was former Ohio football coach Jim Jordan.  He repeatedly passed when it was the R's turn to speak, apparently because he didn't have anyone lined up to take the microphone.  When he eventually got that done, the most notable smart-aleck was Florida's Brian Mast.  Read More 

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January 6, 2021

As Hubby used to say of political meetings, "Everything that needs to be said has been said, but not everyone has said it."  That's how I feel about the crisis of January 6, 2021, a date that will live in infamy.  Great quantities of ink and even more pixels have covered it – and yet there are a few things I want to say that I hope aren't too repetitive.  Because I never watch television during daytime, it was the internet that alerted me to what was going on in Washington.  I turned on the TV and watched into the next morning, making notes on a handy scrap of newspaper that soon became too small.  Read More 

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